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Buy, Install, Find Out How RV Cell Phone Signal Booster Works

Jan 11, 2019

Buy, Install, Find Out How RV Cell Phone Signal Booster Works

RV cell phone signal boosters like the SureCall Fusion2Go 3.0 RV kit (USA version and Canada version) cost under US $500 and help fix cellular reception problem when travelling to remote isolated areas with either the cell tower too far away or wooded areas and large trees blocking the signal from those towers. It is important to note that RV phone boosters boost signals of all mobile carrier networks in USA (AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint, etc.) and Canada (Bell, Rogers, Telus, Freedom Mobile, etc.), respectively.

The USA & Canada version links provided above point to the respective product listings where you can buy this sometimes lifesaver kit. It provides enhanced signal reception when installed properly in any large vehicle such as a recreational vehicle (RV). It works by catching wireless signals from nearby cell towers up to 20 miles away. Then it amplifies them many fold to broadcast them inside the vehicle to help keep cell phones, tablets, mi-fi hotspots, etc. connected consistently to their respective cellular provider's towers in closest proximity. Watch the video below on how to install this kit to solve poor cellphone connection problem permanently.

Installation Tips:

Where to mount the antenna.

Start by mounting the outside antenna on the top of your RV. A few common places are on an existing vent pipe, antenna pole or the RV's ladder. The outside antenna is omnidirectional, meaning it sends and receives signal from all sides. There's no need to aim the antenna in any direction. Just mount it vertically and make sure to get it above the roofline of the RV for the best performance.

Attaching the antenna.

First attach the L bracket to the antenna. Remove the bolts from the bottom of the antenna and line up the holes in the L bracket with the holes on the antenna. Replace the bolts and tighten them down with a wrench. Mount the outside antenna by sliding the U-bolt around a pole. Slide the bracket over the U-bolt followed by the antennas L bracket slide on the washers and nuts and tighten them down with a wrench. Next, attach the included cable to the bottom of the antenna. Then run the cable into your RV in any way you see fit.

Installing the booster.

After above steps, you can install the booster. Based on the outside signal and the amount of separation between your two antennas, the coverage area will vary. We recommend installing the booster near where you will use the phone most often and 15 to 25 feet away from the location of the outside antenna. Connect the outside antenna cable previously run into the RV to the outside antenna connection on the booster. Connect the inside antenna to the inside antenna connection on the opposite side of the booster. Finally, connect the booster to power. The booster can be placed on the counter inside a cabinet or even mounted to the wall or beneath your RV cabinets. Just make sure that the inside antenna is oriented vertically. Mounting the antenna horizontally will decrease the performance of the booster.

That's all there is to it. Now you're ready to go with best chances to catch cell phone signals from all service providers such as AT&T Wireless, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile and Sprint. Check out all USA RV cell phone signal booster kits, and all Canada RV phone booster kits we carry.

Signal Strength Chart in Context of RV Signal Booster

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2 comments

  • I hate trying to get a strong signal when I’m camping. I like the peace of mind of knowing I can call for help if needed and occasionally checking back home. And yes, on occasion I do go online; even though I should be enjoying the camping experience. However, do cell phone boosters really work? There are so many overrated gadgets out there.

    Camper Carl on
  • I’ve seen car and truck cell phone boosters so RV cell phone boosters are probably helpful for people who travel in RV’s and want reliable coverage in areas that are far away from cell towers or where terrain affect them. Can you get away with using a car cell phone booster or do you need an RV one for an RV?

    Kayleigh Atkins on

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